For Healthcare Professionals

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Parents and children in the waiting room of a doctor’s surgery
Supporting your MPS II journey

HOW DOES ELAPRASE WORK?

ELAPRASE was shown to improve walking ability in Hunter syndrome patients aged 5 years and older.

The clinical trial evaluating ELAPRASE in patients aged 16 months to 5 years did not measure walking ability. However, treatment with ELAPRASE was shown to reduce spleen size in patients aged 16 months to 5 years, which was similar to the spleen size reduction shown with ELAPRASE in the clinical trial of patients 5 years and older.

A clinical trial of ELAPRASE in children under 16 months old has not been carried out; therefore, it is not established if ELAPRASE is safe and effective in children under 16 months old.

ELAPRASE mechanism of action

ELAPRASE® mechanism of action ELAPRASE® mechanism of action
1
Step-1

HEALTHY CELL Vs HUNTER SYNDROME AFFECTED CELL

Hunter syndrome patients have insufficient iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme activity. This means substances called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) build up in cells, causing cellular and organ damage.

2
Step-2

HOW ELAPRASE
WORKS

ELAPRASE is an enzyme replacement therapy. It is absorbed into cells where it breaks down GAGs, like the naturally occurring enzyme.

3
Step-3

ELAPRASE TREATED
CELL

ELAPRASE is intended to reduce the levels of GAGs in tissues. Decreases in urinary GAG levels are observed following treatment with ELAPRASE. The responsiveness of urinary GAG to dosage alterations of Elaprase is unknown, and the relationship of urinary GAG to other measures of clinical response has not been established.

Illustration only. Not intended to imply clinical significance.

Important Safety Information
v

RISK OF SERIOUS ALLERGIC REACTIONS

Some patients have experienced serious allergic reactions (including life-threatening anaphylactic reactions) during and up to 24 hours after treatment, regardless of how long they were taking ELAPRASE. Anaphylactic reactions are immediate and include breathing problems, low oxygen levels, low blood pressure, hives and/or swelling of the throat or tongue. If a patient (you or your child) has experienced an anaphylactic reaction, the patient may require an extended period of observation by the patient’s healthcare team. If you or your child has breathing problems, a fever, or a respiratory illness, you or your child may be at risk of life-threatening worsening of those conditions due to allergic reactions from ELAPRASE. Your healthcare team should be advised of those conditions before treatment with ELAPRASE because the information may affect the timing of ELAPRASE treatment.

You or your child should be closely watched during and after ELAPRASE treatment and you should confirm with your healthcare team in advance of treatment that it is prepared to manage serious allergic reactions, including anaphylactic reactions. Tell your healthcare team immediately if any signs of an allergic reaction happen. Those signs may include breathing problems, low blood pressure, rash, hives, itching, flushing, fever and/or headache.

When serious allergic reactions happened during clinical trials, later ELAPRASE treatments were managed with allergy-controlling drugs before or during treatment, a slower rate of ELAPRASE treatment, and/or early discontinuation of treatment.

Children with serious genetic mutations may be at risk for allergic reactions, serious side effects and antibody development. In a clinical study of children 7 years and younger, patients with certain types of genetic mutations experienced a higher number of allergic reactions, serious side effects, and development of an immune response to treatment. This immune response may interfere with the effectiveness of ELAPRASE. Talk to your healthcare team about whether you or your child may be at risk.

If you or your child has breathing problems, other respiratory illness, heart problems, or susceptibility to fluid overload, you or your child may be at higher risk of fluid overload during ELAPRASE treatment. Your healthcare team should be advised of those problems before treatment and you should confirm with your healthcare team in advance of treatment that it is appropriately trained to watch for signs of fluid overload and provide the necessary medical support. Patients at risk for fluid overload may require longer observation time.

What are possible side effects of ELAPRASE?
The most common side effects of ELAPRASE include:

  • In patients aged 5 and older:
    • - Headache
    • - Itching
    • - Muscle and bone pain
    • - Hives
    • - Diarrhea
    • - Cough
  • In patients aged 7 years or younger:
    • - Fever
    • - Rash
    • - Vomiting
    • - Hives

The most common side effects needing medical attention were allergic reactions, and included rash, hives, itching, flushing, fever, and headache. Tell your healthcare team immediately if any signs of an allergic reaction happen. These are not all the possible side effects of ELAPRASE.

What is ELAPRASE (idursulfase)?

ELAPRASE is a prescription medicine for patients with Hunter syndrome. ELAPRASE has been shown to improve walking ability in patients 5 yrs and older. In patients 16 months to 5 years old, ELAPRASE did not show improvement in disease-related symptoms or long-term clinical results; however, treatment with ELAPRASE has reduced spleen size similarly to patients 5 yrs and older. It is not known if ELAPRASE is safe and effective in children under 16 months old.